The love of Nikolai Petrovich and Fenechka – it is important to know

The Story of Relationship between Nikolai Petrovich and Fenechka

The writer, a subtle observer, noted: Fenechka was stubborn. But somehow – as an honest girl, who deep down in her heart did not really want to resist. In short, “she stubbornly resisted, and he was able to resume and prolong his kiss.”

And then “a dry cough resounded behind the lilacs.” Behind them, like a piano in the bushes, peeped the main Bazarov’s enemy, Pavel Petrovich Kirsanov. An idealist of about forty-five. A disappointed aesthete. Bazarov called him disparagingly an “aristocrat.” And Fenechka was afraid of him: he looks at her so-and-so, the horror. And he walks on her heels.

Let us recall: Fenechka was a simple girl from the yard, the daughter of the housekeeper of Nikolai Petrovich Kirsanov, brother of Pavel Petrovich and father of Arkady, Bazarov’s friend. Her mother died, and Fenechka was like a lonely angel – Nikolai Petrovich’s wife had also passed away, and he was kind and modest and loved to play the cello. So he and Fenechka had a boy. But he never found out about Bazarov’s kiss. And Bazarov was challenged to a duel by Pavel Petrovich – once a brave captain and an Angloman, and an old-fashioned freethinker, disappointed in everything from his unhappy love for the semi-mystical “Princess R.”

And what happened next is common knowledge.

But who is this Fenechka? Where did Turgenev get her from?

Characteristics of the image of Fenechka

The girl’s full name is Fedosya Nikolaevna. This is a young, beautiful woman of twenty-three. By birth she was a free peasant woman. Fenechka’s parents were once given a freehold. Her mother worked as housekeeper for the Kirsanovs, and her father died long ago. Fenechka’s mother’s ability to keep the house clean and tidy pleasantly impressed her hosts.

However, at the age of twenty the girl became a complete orphan after her mother died of cholera. After her death, Feodosia stayed at the Kirsanov house. They had often seen Barin Nikolai Petrovich before, but after the girl was left alone, they fell in love with each other. The couple began to live together and they had a son Mitenka. Nikolai Kirsanov was ashamed of the girl’s low origin, so he did not divulge their relationship too much. But despite this, he still loved Theodosia very much.

The girl was at the very center of events when Evgeny Bazarov stopped to visit Kirsanov’s house. It seemed to him that Fenechka was lonely and so he once dared to kiss her – it was very unexpected for her. The incident was seen by Pavel Kirsanov, the brother of Feodosia’s lover. As it turned out, he also liked the girl, because her appearance and manner reminded him of a certain noblewoman with whom he was once acquainted.

As a young man, Paul had been in love with that girl, but their story ended tragically. So he became jealous of Fenechka and challenged him to a duel.

Letter about the son

In 1862, when Fathers and Children appeared in the Russian Gazette, Ivan Sergeyevich received a letter from Elena Kochubey, the daughter of the Decembrist Sergei Volkonsky – with some hints about the Fenichek, with whom he was advised to be careful. Turgenev replied jokingly (13/25 April 1862) from Paris: “I am very glad that you liked my novel. – As for the Fenichka and the danger they pose to me-you have, as they say, put your finger on the wound-and my only hope is that I shall soon grow so old that not even one Fenichka will want to share her fate with mine.”

And yet Fenichka was-not fleeting at all. More precisely, it was not Fenechka, but Feoktista Volkova.

Let us not listen to the gossip-mongers, let us hear what Turgenev himself had to say. In a letter to his old friend Ivan Maslov, the chief of the Moscow Specific Office of Imperial Property (18/30 June 1865, Spasskoye):

“Dear Ivan Ilyich!

Today I shall have a talk with you, not about sales and money, but about an entirely different matter. Listen.

In 1851, 2 and 3 years in St. Petersburg and here there lived a girl named Theoktista, with whom I had a connection. You may have heard of her. I subsequently helped her to marry a small official of the maritime ministry – and she is now thriving in St. Petersburg. On leaving me in ’53 she was pregnant and had a son in Moscow, Ivan, whom she sent to an orphanage. I have good reason to suppose that the son was not mine, but I cannot vouch for it with certainty. He may, perhaps, be a work of mine. This son, named Ivan, went to the village of a peasant, to whom he was given as a breadwinner.

Feoktista, who went to him last year, secretly from her husband, could not tell me where the village is and what it is called; she only knows that it was 50 versts away and that its name is Prudische. She also has reason to believe that some lady took a child with her – who had a bad life in the village – and that the lady ended up in the hospital. From all this you can conclude that this Theoktista has a weak head.

Now she is going to Moscow again (she came here to see me – her husband has been released for a month in Bogoroditsk district) – and I have sent her to you, so that you may help her in her inquiries. If this Ivan is alive and found – I would be willing to put him in a trade school – and pay for him.

At any rate, be so kind as to give your high patronage to this Feoktista Petrovna Volkova, who will come to you with a letter from me. Her husband knows nothing; he is, however, a very humble and decent man.

NB. Do not give money to Feoktista-she has already received it from me.”

There were more letters to Maslov. But whether Maslov found Feoktista Volkova’s son and what happened to this boy is unknown.

Fenechka – the embodiment of youth and naturalness

Fenechka is the embodiment of youth and naturalness. – Female characters in the novel

I would like to begin my work with a reflection on Fenechka. And it is no accident the first appearance of Fenechka leaves in the soul of something soft, warm and very natural: “It was a young woman of twenty-three, all white and soft, with dark hair and eyes, with red, childish plump lips and delicate hands. She wore a neat chintz dress, and a blue new kerchief rested lightly on her round shoulders.

It should be noted that Fenechka did not appear before Arkady and Bazarov on the first day of their arrival. On that day she seemed ill, although, of course, she was healthy. The reason was very simple: she was terribly shy.

The duplicity of her situation was evident: a peasant woman whom the master had allowed to live in his house, and who was himself ashamed of it. Nikolai Petrovich did the seemingly noble deed. He took in the woman who had borne his child, which is to say, he recognized certain of her rights, and he did not conceal that Mitya was his son. But he behaved in such a way that Fenechka could not feel free, and could only cope with her position through her naturalness and dignity.

This is how Nikolai Petrovich says of her to Arkady: “Don’t call her, please, loudly. Well, yes. she lives with me now. I put her in the house. there were two small rooms. However, this can all be changed.” He did not say anything about the little son; he was too embarrassed.

But then Fenechka appeared before the guests: “She lowered her eyes and stopped at the table, leaning lightly on her fingertips. She seemed both ashamed that she had come, and at the same time, as if she felt she had the right to do so.

It seems to me that Turgenev sympathizes with Fenechka and admires her. It is as if he wanted to defend her and show that in her motherhood she is not only beautiful but also above all beliefs and prejudices: “And really, is there anything on earth more captivating than a young, beautiful mother with a healthy baby in her arms?” Bazarov, living with Kirsanov, happy to communicate only with Fenechka: “Even his face changed when he was talking to her. It took on a clear expression, almost kind, and his usual carelessness mingled with some playful attention. I think that it is not only in Fenechka’s beauty, but precisely in her naturalness, absence of any affectation and attempts to play the young lady.

Bazarov fell in love with Fenechka; once he kissed her tenderly on the open lips and thereby violated all the laws of hospitality and all the rules of morality. The nihilist in love and then rejected is agonizing over his failure. He quickly and almost effortlessly “makes up” for his defeat at Odintsova’s by his success with Fenechka. She likes Bazarov, too; he knows how to treat her, deftly plays on their mutual antipathy toward Pavel Petrovich, but she is morally pure; she does not notice Bazarov’s “male” gaze and treats him with friendship. Pretty, affectionate, but simple-minded Fenechka (“kitty”) resembles Bazarov’s mother in her youth. She would suit the role of the wife of the district doctor, a role that fate has prepared for the young nihilist and which he does his best to avoid.

Pavel Petrovich was even in love with Fenechka, several times he came to her room “for nothing,” several times he remained alone with her, but he was not so low as to kiss her. On the contrary, because of the kiss he fought with Bazarov in a duel and in order not to be further seduced by Fenechka, he went abroad.

The image of Fenechka is like a delicate flower, which, however, has unusually strong roots. It seems to me that of all the heroines in the novel, she is the closest to the “Turgenev women”. Fenechka could give Nikolai Petrovich love, kindness, care, respect, which he undoubtedly deserved, being a kind and decent man. In turn, Nikolai Petrovich gave Fenechka reliable protection, respect, love.

Fenechka cannot be classified as a “Turgenev woman,” but she is deeply sympathetic to both the author and, I think, readers, as she is the very nature and charm.

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Source: Fenechka – the embodiment of youth and naturalness A site devoted to the life and work of the great Russian writer, critic and translator Ivan Turgenev. https://www.ivan-turgenev.ru/referats/157-2.html

After the Idyll

Surely many things were added to such non-binding stories. What better reason to sulk – Turgenev’s enemies as well as his friends always abounded. It is impossible to know whether the writer paid 700 rubles for Theoktista, but even if he had, he had the right to do so. To judge those times and morals by modern standards is ridiculous – so we will not. But these rumours do at least give us an idea of how Turgenev got Theoktista.

In 1852, the writer was exiled to Spasskoye. For a couple of years. For publishing a posthumous obituary dedicated to Gogol. The reason was strange-but that’s not what we’re talking about now. He moved from St. Petersburg to Spasskoye and Theoktista.

Berg described what “all sorts of rich matter, clothes, jewelry, fine linen” Ivan Sergeyevich dressed his “serf mistress” – and lived with her in Spasskoye just as cellist Nikolai Petrovich Kirsanov did with Fenechka in Fathers and Children. Although not too ostentatious about this fact – or rather, simply hid it. It wasn’t exactly progressive, after all.

What about Theoktista? The exiled Turgenev was visited in Spasskoye by a noisy company – Botkin, Druzhinin, Grigorovich. He became acquainted with the Tolstoys – Maria Nikolaevna (Leo Nikolayevich’s sister) and her husband – who lived nearby. Maria Nikolayevna came to Spasskoye over and over again – Turgenev was crazy about her, and so was she. And in the near future all this would end with Tolstaya leaving her husband. Lev Nikolayevich wrote in his diary: it was not good–he had written this sin on Turgenev’s account. Yes, but back then, in the mid-1850s, Olga Turgeneva, the writer’s cousin and the perfect angel, the “Turgenev girl”, also turned up in Ivan Sergeyevich’s life, and she was even put down as a bride…

Love of Nikolai Petrovich and Phenechki

“. “Kiss the hand of the barina, silly,” said Arina to her. ” (the peasants kissed the Barin’s hand)

“. Her husband died long ago. ” (It’s about Fenechka’s father)

“Her mother, Arina, died of cholera. ” (Fenechka’s mother died of cholera when her daughter was about 20 years old)

“. And indeed, is there anything more captivating in the world than a young, beautiful mother with a healthy child in her arms. “

“. It is known of whom: one pretty only. “

“. Your father must have a good lip. “

“. Fenechka. She was a young woman of about twenty-three, all white and soft, with dark hair and eyes, and red, childishly plump lips and delicate hands. She wore a neat chintz dress; a blue new headscarf lay lightly on her round shoulders. “

“. a young woman’s face flashed. “

“. in a blue showercoat and with a white kerchief thrown over her dark hair, a young woman, Fenechka. “

“…hot blood ran in a scarlet wave under the thin skin of her pretty face. “

“…quietly stepped out. “She walked a little slobbery, but it stuck to her, too. “

“. Fenechka put her hair back in order, and put on a better headscarf, but she could have stayed as she was. “

“. put his lips to Fenechka’s hand, white as milk on Mitya’s red shirt. “

“. Fenechka’s face slid before him so pale and small. “

“. Fenechka was getting prettier every day. There is an epoch in the life of young women when they suddenly begin to blossom and blossom like summer roses; such an epoch had come for Fenechka. Everything was conducive to this, even the July heat of the day. Dressed in a light white dress, she herself seemed whiter and lighter: the tan did not stick to her, and the heat, from which she could not escape, slightly flushed her cheeks and ears, and, pouring a quiet laziness into her whole body, was reflected with a dozing languor in her pretty eyes. She almost could not work; her hands slid to her knees. She could hardly walk, and complained with amused impotence. “

“. She sat on the bench, with her usual white handkerchief over her head. “

“. Fenechka raised her eyes at Bazarov, which seemed even darker from the whitish glow that fell on the top of her face. “

“. Pretty was the expression of her eyes when she looked as if furtively, and laughed affectionately and a little silly. “

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“. in her pretty eyes. “

“. I love it when you talk. It’s like a brook babbling. “

“. Hello,” she answered in a low but resounding voice. “

“… she assumes… she is ashamed. “

“. She is ashamed in vain. “

“…putting it before Pavel Petrovitch, she is ashamed. “

“. She seemed both ashamed that she had come, and at the same time as if she felt that she had the right to come. “

“If you let her live with you under the same roof, then she deserves it. “

“. Of course, if this girl hadn’t been worth… It wasn’t a frivolous whim. “

“. Fenechka told everyone in the house you. “

“…seldom saw her: she lived quietly, modestly. “

“. Oh, how I love that empty creature. “

“. She inherited her mother’s love of order. “

“. “She inherited from her mother “…of her mother’s prudence and steadfastness. “

“. On their paper lids, Fenechka herself had written in large letters “mugwort. “

“. – How many months old is he? – Pavel Petrovich asked.

– Six months; he will soon be seven, on the eleventh. “

“. I love Nikolai Petrovich with all my heart. I love Nikolai Petrovich with all my heart – I don’t have to live after that! I love Nikolai Petrovich alone in the world, and will love him forever. “

“. A week ago, in a small parish church, quietly and almost without witnesses, two weddings took place: Arkady and Katya, and Nikolai Petrovitch and Fenechka. “

Source: Love Nikolai Petrovich and Phenechka Phenechka Fathers and Children, Phenechka in the novel Fathers and Children, Phenechka Fathers and Children Characteristics, Phenechka Fathers and Children Turgenev https://www.literaturus.ru/2015/08/fenechka-otcy-i-deti-harakteristika.html

Where was Theoktista’s place here?

Nikolai Berg’s version: “An idyllic year passed … maybe even less … the new baron of Theoctista began to get very bored. There was no way to talk with her about anything else but neighborhood squabbles and gossip. She was even illiterate! Ivan Sergeyevich tried to teach her to read and write in the first honeymoon months (when he almost never parted with her), but alas! It did not go far: his student was mortally bored with the lessons, angry… Then there were the usual fits of “married women”, and then came on the scene a beautiful child … “.

In May 1855, Pavel Annenkov, Pushkin’s first biographer, who often helped Turgenev in a friendly manner in sensitive matters, reported on the work on Pushkin’s Works and added, in between, the news of Feoktista’s pregnancy. In reply Ivan Sergeevich wrote anxiously: “Things are going very badly about Feoktista, all the more so because it is not my doing – please give her your patronage, and one day I shall send her another 25 rubles. By the way, why did you tell Kolbasin to tell me I was a ‘thing’? I don’t understand!”

In short, nothing good ever came to Feoktista, of course. In 1856 Turgenev finally received permission, and rushed to Paris. It was clear to everyone: he was going to Polina Viardot. But there are too many unknowns in the story…

Image and characterization of Fenechka in the novel “Fathers and Children”: description of appearance and character in quotations

The image and characterization of Fenechka in the novel “Fathers and Children”

“. It was a young woman of about twenty-three. “

The full name of the heroine is Fedosya Nikolaevna:

Fenechka is a peasant by birth. Apparently, her parents were given free will and became free peasants : “. “Kiss the hand of the barina, silly one,” Arina said to her. ” (The peasants kissed the Barin’s hand)

Young Fenechka was left an orphan at the age of 20: “. Her husband died long ago. ” (It’s about Fenechka’s father) “. Her mother, Arina, died of cholera. ” (Fenechka’s mother died of cholera when her daughter was about 20 years old).

Fenechka is a beautiful young woman: “. Indeed, is there anything on earth more captivating than a young, beautiful mother with a healthy child in her arms. ” “. What a pretty one. ” “. You know of whom: only one is pretty. ” “. Your father must have a good lip. “

The following is known about Fenechka’s appearance: “. Fenechka. She was a young woman of about twenty-three, all white and soft, with dark hair and eyes, with red, childishly plump lips and delicate hands. She wore a neat chintz dress; a blue new kerchief lay lightly on her round shoulders. “. a young woman’s face flashed. “… wearing a blue showercoat and with a white kerchief thrown over her dark hair, a young woman, Fenechka. “

“. a soft mass of black, shiny, slightly disheveled hair showed. “… hot blood spilled scarlet under the thin skin of her pretty face. “…quietly stepped out. “She walked a little slobbery, but it stuck to her, too. ” “. Fenechka had tidied her hair and put on a better headscarf, but she could have stayed as she was. “. put his lips to Fenechka’s hand, which was as white as milk on Mitya’s red shirt. “. Fenechka’s face slid before him so pale and small. ” “. Fenechka was getting prettier every day. There is an epoch in the life of young women when they suddenly begin to blossom and blossom like summer roses; such an epoch had come for Fenechka. Everything was conducive to this, even the July heat that was then. Dressed in a light white dress, she herself seemed whiter and lighter: the tan did not stick to her, and the heat, from which she could not escape, slightly flushed her cheeks and ears, and, pouring a quiet laziness into her whole body, was reflected with a dozing languor in her pretty eyes. She almost could not work; her hands slid to her knees. She could hardly walk, and complained with amused impotence. ” “. She sat on the bench, with her usual white handkerchief over her head. “

She has “pretty eyes”: “. Fenechka raised her eyes at Bazarov, which seemed even darker from the whitish glow that fell on the top of her face. ” “. Pretty was the expression of her eyes when she looked as if furtively, and laughed affectionately and a little foolish. “…in her pretty eyes. “

She has a nice voice: “. I love it when you talk. It’s like a brook babbling. ” “. Hello,” she answered in a low but resounding voice. “

Fenechka is a bashful girl: “… she assumes… she is ashamed. ” “. In vain she is ashamed. “. putting it before Pavel Petrovitch, all ashamed. ” “. She seemed both ashamed that she had come, and at the same time as if she felt that she had the right to come. “

Fenechka is a worthy woman, according to Nikolai Petrovich Kirsanov and his son Arkady: “If you let her live with you under the same roof, then she deserves it. ” “. Of course, if this girl were not worthy… This is not a frivolous whim. “

Fenechka is a polite girl: “. Fenechka told everyone in the house you. “

She is a quiet and modest girl: “. a rare one saw her: she lived quietly, modestly. “

Fenechka is an empty creature, according to Pavel Petrovich Kirsanov: “. Ah, how I love this empty creature. “

At the same time, Fenechka is a good hostess. She is orderly: “. She has inherited from her mother a love of order. “

She is a sensible and sedate girl: “. she inherited from her mother. sensible and sedate. “

The relationship of Fenechka and Nikolai Petrovich Kirsanov

At the beginning of the novel the peasant Fenechka is the unofficial wife of the landowner Nikolai Petrovich Kirsanov:

“. this girl, about whom you have probably already heard . she now lives with me. I put her in the house … there were two small rooms. “

Fenechka and Nikolai Petrovich have a little son Mitya :

“…Fenechka came in with Mitya in her arms. ” “. – How many months old is he? – Pavel Petrovich asked. – Six months; soon he will be seven, on the eleventh. “

Fenechka loves Nikolai Petrovich; she is grateful to him for his good attitude toward her: “. I love Nikolai Petrovich with all my heart. I do not love Nikolai Petrovich, and after that I do not need to live. I love Nikolai Petrovich alone in the world and will love him forever. “

At the end of the novel Nikolai Petrovich marries Fenechka, despite the fact that she is a peasant and such marriages were condemned in noble society: “. A week ago, in a small parish church, quietly and almost without witnesses, two weddings took place: Arkady with Katya and Nikolai Petrovich with Fenechka. “

This was the quoted image and characterization of Fenechka in the novel “Fathers and Children” by Turgenev: a description of the appearance and character of the heroine. See: All materials on the novel “Fathers and Children”

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